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Exploring Death Valley

Unlike many of our beautiful area National Parks, Death Valley is at its busiest and most beautiful in the winter.

At only 150 miles away, Death Valley is the closest national park to the Las Vegas Valley.  Visitors to the park pay a $20 entrance fee or can use federal recreation passes.  There are many different routes you can take to arrive at Death Valley and they each bring impressive desert scenery along the route.

The park contains hundreds of hidden springs and seeps, a few creeks and even a year-round waterfall.  When it gets some rain in the Valley, the landscapes change to bright colors with wildflowers all around.

Visitors to the park this season will also notice the major new renovations to the Furnace Creek Visitor Center.  While preserving the midcentury modern style of the 50-year-old visitor center, the project made the structure much more energy efficient, increased the size of the lobby, updated the theater, improved parking and traffic flow and added new exhibits and restrooms.

As everyone knows, it can get pretty hot in Death Valley in the summer, with a record temperature of 134 in July 1913.  It also can get pretty cold there.  They experienced a record low of 15 degrees earlier this month.

There are many activities that you can do while in the park including; hiking, camping and guided activities.

I have been to Death Valley only one time and the colors in the vistas were truly amazing.  I had not expected such a desolate environment to contain such beauty.  I will definitely be planning another trip there in the future.

For more information on Death Valley click here; http://www.lvrj.com/living/death-valley-springs-to-life-during-cooler-months-188561531.html

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